“Preaching is biblical whenever the preacher allows a text from the Bible to serve as the leading force in shaping the content and purpose of the sermon. More”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“ritual reenactment of how the church comes to know who it is, who God is, and what God calls it to be. How does the church find guidance from God? It prayerfully goes to Scripture and then wrestles with the meaning of what it finds there. Biblical preaching models this way of knowing. Biblical”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“it models the primary way in which the church comes to know God’s will.”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“Throughout its history, the church has discovered that when it goes to the Scripture in openness and trust, it finds itself uniquely addressed there by God and its identity as the people of God shaped by that encounter.”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“church has discovered that when it goes to the Scripture in faith, it finds itself encountered by Christ in ways that serve as the keys for understanding its encounters with Christ everywhere else.”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“Why biblical texts? Because biblical texts have the power to release what Brueggemann calls a “counter-imagination,” a way of seeing the world that is an alternative to the consumerist, militaristic, death-obsessed imagination of the culture.”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“use the Bible critically.”9”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“Exegesis produces its best results when it is carried out in the context of the living faith of the Christian community, which is directed toward the salvation of the entire world.”11 That is also why many biblical scholars and teachers”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“Knowing that we come to Scripture from and within a theological tradition reminds us that entirely new ground is not being broken. The church has been to this text before—many times—and a theological tradition is, in part, the church’s memory of past encounters with this and other biblical texts. A theologically informed interpreter of Scripture enters the text guided by a map drawn and refined by those who have come to this place before. Coming to a text from a theological tradition, the”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
I. Getting the Text in View
      A. Select the text
      B. Reconsider where the text begins and ends
      C. Establish a reliable translation of the text
II. Getting Introduced to the Text
      D. Read the text for basic understanding
      E. Place the text in its larger context
III. Attending to the Text
      F. Listen attentively to the text
IV. Testing What Is Heard in the Text
      G. Explore the text historically
      H. Explore the literary character of the text
      I. Explore the text theologically
     J. Check the text in the commentaries
V. Moving toward the Sermon
      K. State the claim of the text upon the hearers (including the preacher)
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“The preacher, not the commentator, is the one sent by these people at this moment to this text, and, therefore, only the preacher truly knows the full range of questions to ask.”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“Questioning a text is a creative, imaginative activity—something like brainstorming.”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“Exegesis can help us in many ways, but it finally cannot do what is most important: tell us what this text wishes to say on this occasion to our congregation. The preacher must decide this, and it is a risky and exciting decision. Getting”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition
“action. We must discover the patterns, customs, and even the habits around which they organize their lives. If we look at them and see only our own reflection, we do not know them. If we look at them and see only an “other,” an object of our scrutiny, we do not know them. Only when we know who they are with us can we claim really to know them. An exegetical process introduces us to the text. It provides some crucial biographical information, and it even discloses some of the text’s secrets. It is up to the preacher, then, to bring the life of the congregation into the text’s presence, to dwell there long and prayerfully, and to discern the reality of this text as it is with us. This is eventful. Something happens between text and people: a claim is made, a voice is heard, a textual will is exerted, and the sermon will be a bearing witness to this event. As the final step in the exegetical process, the preacher throws the first cord across the gap between text and sermon by describing the text’s claim upon the hearers, including the preacher. We are ready to move on to the creation of the sermon itself only when we can finish the following sentence: “In relation”
Thomas G. Long, The Witness of Preaching, Second Edition